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Goats: Factory farms

goats factory farms

Causes: Rising demand of goat meat and milk

Foodprint on goats: Confinement, Toxic living conditions, Denial of natural behavior, Chronic diseases, Psychological disorders, Mutilations, Abuses during transport & slaughter

Rapid increases in demand and the destruction of grazing lands, is leading to goats being increasingly bred in confined closed environments on factory farms. Overcrowded, toxic and filthy living conditions - the industry standard for factory farms - are now being applied to these long-range free roaming animals.

At a young age, baby goats are taken from their mothers and kept in separate enclosures. They are also subjected to painful body mutilations such as disbudding and castrations, without the use of painkillers of veterinary care.

A lack of movement or exercise, unnatural flooring in sheds and a toxic environment of ammonia fumes lead to a number of chronic diseases in goats. 

Did you know?

Goats are inquisitive, intelligent and social animals used to roaming the countryside in close-knit family structures. They are friendly animals, known to form individual friendships and get despondent if their friend is taken away. Female goats are patient and nurturing mothers.

  • Rapid increases in demand and the destruction of grazing lands, is leading to goats being increasingly bred in confined closed environments. Broiler goats, are made to spend the bulk of their lives in desolate sheds, and denied freedom of movement or exercise. Picture source: web commons
    Rapid increases in demand and the destruction of grazing lands, is leading to goats being increasingly bred in confined closed environments. Broiler goats, are made to spend the bulk of their lives in desolate sheds, and denied freedom of movement or exercise. Picture source: web commons
  • Goats are confined to small overcrowded stalls with limited space to move. While some farms allow a little amount of exercise, most goats will spend their entire life confined to their stall. This is done so that their muscles don't develop and the flesh stays tender. Picture source: web commons
    Goats are confined to small overcrowded stalls with limited space to move. While some farms allow a little amount of exercise, most goats will spend their entire life confined to their stall. This is done so that their muscles don't develop and the flesh stays tender. Picture source: web commons
  • Baby goats are taken from their mothers within 3 months of age, and transferred to small stalls where they are crowded in with other young lambs. Picture source: web commons
    Baby goats are taken from their mothers within 3 months of age, and transferred to small stalls where they are crowded in with other young lambs. Picture source: web commons
  • Goats are disbudded at a young age. Disbudding is the removal of the sensitive, nerve filled horn buds by pressing a searing cylindrical iron into the bud and surrounding flesh for 8-15 seconds per burn. Each bud is burnt an average of 2 to 3 times. Picture source: web commons
    Goats are disbudded at a young age. Disbudding is the removal of the sensitive, nerve filled horn buds by pressing a searing cylindrical iron into the bud and surrounding flesh for 8-15 seconds per burn. Each bud is burnt an average of 2 to 3 times. Picture source: web commons
  • Goats are either forced to get pregnant by forcing a male onto the female via a contraption, or are artificially inseminated with semen. Mother goats raised for milk, face similar levels of body abuse as faced by cows in the dairy industry.  Picture source: Indian goat breeder site
    Goats are either forced to get pregnant by forcing a male onto the female via a contraption, or are artificially inseminated with semen. Mother goats raised for milk, face similar levels of body abuse as faced by cows in the dairy industry. Picture source: Indian goat breeder site
  • To slaughter the goat, a knife is used to cut the jugular vein, which leads to the eventual death of the animal through being bled out. Very often knives blunted by overuse, do not cut the jugular vein properly, and many goats are still conscious, while their legs are hacked off or they are deskinned. Picture source: web commons
    To slaughter the goat, a knife is used to cut the jugular vein, which leads to the eventual death of the animal through being bled out. Very often knives blunted by overuse, do not cut the jugular vein properly, and many goats are still conscious, while their legs are hacked off or they are deskinned. Picture source: web commons
  • The natural lifespan of goats is between 8-12 years, but in factory farms goats are taken for slaughter by the age of 4-6 months.  Goats are herded into overcrowded trucks, where they undertake long journeys without access to food, water or veterinary care. Picture source: VSPCA
    The natural lifespan of goats is between 8-12 years, but in factory farms goats are taken for slaughter by the age of 4-6 months. Goats are herded into overcrowded trucks, where they undertake long journeys without access to food, water or veterinary care. Picture source: VSPCA