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Pravin K Shah

The evening I was there, the farm was shipping three baby calves in a truck to a veal factory. The mother cows were crying when their babies were separated from them. I cannot forget the scene and can still hear the cries of the mother cows.
President, Jain study center, NC USA

President, Jain study center of North Carolina, US.
Read his account: "my visit to a dairy farm" to get a personal account on how cows are treated, his views on whether milk from the modern dairy industry is compatible with Jain beliefs and how he became an instant vegan post visiting the dairy farm.

Quotes: 
The evening I was there, the farm was shipping three baby calves in a truck to a veal factory. The mother cows were crying when their babies were separated from them. I cannot forget the scene and can still hear the cries of the mother cows.
In the past (before the birth of a high tech dairy farm) in India, the cows were treated like a part of the family, and after feeding the baby calf, leftover milk was consumed by humans. This may be the reason why milk and its product is not considered violent in our scriptures.
Needless to say that the dairy farm tour made me an instant vegan.
Both Swetambar and Digambar sects use milk and its products in temple rituals. This is an old tradition and as I mentioned above that in the past the milk was not produced using the modern day dairy technology, which tortures the cows and ultimately slaughters them. We should reevaluate the usage of milk in the temple rituals under the new technological environment. The tradition should not be followed blindly. The highest Jain principle of nonviolence should not be compromised under any circumstances.