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Protein consumption and bone fractures in women

John Hopkins study indicates high protein intake (especially animal proteins) associated with higher risks of bone fractures
D Feskanich, WC. Willett, MJ Stampfer, GA Colditz (John Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health)

Method
In this prospective study, usual dietary intake was measured in 1980 in a cohort of 85,900 women, aged 35-59 years, who were participants in the Nurses' Health Study. A mailed food frequency questionnaire was used and incident hip (n = 234) and distal forearm (n = 1,628) fractures were identified by self-report during the following 12 years. Information on other factors related to osteoporosis, including obesity, use of postmenopausal estrogen, smoking, and physical activity, was collected on biennial questionnaires. Dietary measures were updated in 1984 and 1986
Results
Protein was associated with an increased risk of forearm fracture (relative risk (RR) = 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CO 1.04-1.43, p for trend = 0.01) for women who consumed more than 95 g per day compared with those who consumed less than 68 g per day. A similar increase in risk was observed for animal protein, but no association was found for consumption of vegetable protein. Women who consumed five or more servings of red meat per week also had a significantly increased risk of forearm fracture (RR = 1.23, 95% Cl 1.01-1.50) compared with women who ate red meat less than once per week..